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Distribution

If you create a useful extension of ImageJ—e.g., a plugin, script or macro—the next step is to distribute it to others, including:

  • Distribute the extension itself to users
  • Share the extension’s source code
  • Document the extension somewhere

Best practices

Here is a quick summary of the most recommended options:

The tables below discuss additional options for these three aspects of distribution. Green items are recommended. Other options are given but not recommended for various reasons.

Distributing your extension

The first goal is to get your extension into the hands of users.

Create your own update site

Steps

Distribute it as part of Fiji

Steps

Serve it from a website as a download

Steps

  • Create an archive (TAR, ZIP, etc.).
  • Upload the archive to the relevant web space, and link it.

Sharing your source code

If you want to facilitate good science, please share your source code. Otherwise, your extension is a black box and its results are not verifiable.

Host on GitHub in your userspace or organization

Steps

Host on GitHub in the Fiji organization (for extensions distributed with Fiji)

Steps

Host on BitBucket

Steps

  • Similar to GitHub, but using BitBucket instead.

Host on SourceForge

Steps

Serve it from a website as a download

Steps

  • Create an archive (TAR, ZIP, etc.).
  • Upload the archive to the relevant web space, and link it.
  • Users download and unpack the archive.

Documenting your extension

Useful extensions deserve corresponding documentation explaining how to use them.

Create an ImageJ wiki page

Steps

Use the ImageJ Information and Documentation Portal (IIDP)

Steps

  • Request an account from an IIDP administrator.
  • Create a page for your extension.

Add a page to the ImageJ 1.x website

Steps

Create your own webpage elsewhere

Steps

(Varies)